Dixie National Forest

Scenic Canyons Recreational Services Inc BBB Business Review

    Scenic Canyons Recreational Services has acquired the special use permit to manage the campgrounds in the Powell, Escalante, Pine Valley and Cedar City ranger districts on the Dixie National Forest.

    The Dixie National Forest, headquartered in Cedar City, Utah, provided this description of the area:

    The Dixie National Forest occupies almost two million acres and stretches for about 170 miles across southern Utah The largest National Forest in Utah straddles the divide between the Great Basin and the Colorado Plateau.

    Elevations vary from 2,800 feet near St. George, Utah, to 11,322 feet at Blue Bell Knoll on Boulder Mountain. The southern rim of the Great Basin, near the Colorado River, provides spectacular scenery. Colorado River canyons are made up of many-colored cliffs and steep-walled gorges.

    The Forest is divided into four geographic areas. High altitude forests in gently rolling hills characterize the Markagunt, Paunsaugunt, and Aquarius plateaus, while the fourth area, Boulder Mountain, is one of the largest high-elevation plateaus in the United States, and is dotted with hundreds of small lakes 10,000 to 11,000 feet above sea level.

    Some of the most popular recreational pursuits on the Forest include:

    •     Driving for pleasure. This activity can occur anywhere on the Forest, but occurs primarily on scenic byways (Highways 12 (an All-American Road), 14, 143, and 148). These drives provide views of scenic vistas, beautiful wildflowers, and spectacular fall colors.

    •     Camping. Most areas have developed campsites.

    •     Hunting. There are ample opportunities to find game of all kind, including elk, antelope, deer, and mountain lion.

    •     Fishing. There are numerous streams, lakes, and reservoirs that provide excellent angling, including the East Fork of the Sevier River, Tropic Reservoir, Pine Lake and Posey Lake. Reservoirs are popular spots for family outings.

    •     Boating. Boating on the Forest is limited primarily to Panguitch Lake, Tropic Reservoir, Navajo Lake, and Upper Enterprise Reservoir.

    •     Wildlife viewing. There are excellent areas, trails, and drives that provide areas for viewing the abundant diversity of wildlife.

    •     Rock climbing. Some of the geology of the Dixie National Forest has resulted in outstanding opportunities for sport climbers in areas that have outcroppings of hard volcanic, sandstone, and limestone deposits.

    •     Off-highway Vehicle (OHV) travel. This activity is popular on the Forest. Routes traverse some of the most spectacular country the area has to offer.

    •     Horseback riding. Horseback day rides are a very popular activity on the Forest. Many trailheads are popular staging areas. In addition, there are several campgrounds with equestrian facilities and trail opportunities (e.g., Coyote Hollow on the Powell Ranger District).


For more information, visit the Forest Service website.